Profile

 

 
                  Stamford Hill                                        Greater London
             

OS grid reference

TQ335875

   

 

London borough

Hackney

Ceremonial county

Greater London

Region

London

Country

England

Sovereign state

United Kingdom

Post town

LONDON

Postcode district

E5, N16

Dialling code

020

Police

Metropolitan

Fire

London

Ambulance

London

EU Parliament

London

UK Parliament

Hackney North and Stoke Newington

London Assembly

North East

 

 

 


Stamford Hill
is a place in north London in the London Borough of Hackney, England, near the border with Haringey. It is a very ethnically diverse community and is home to Europe's largest Hasidic Jewish Community. It also has a very large Muslim community. It is the only known place in the world where the Muslim and Jewish communities enjoy a strong positive relationship.

 

History

Stamford Hill lies on the old Roman road of Ermine Street, on high ground above Stoke Newington, where it crosses the road from the medieval village of Clopton (the modern Upper and Lower Clapton) into Hackney. By the 18th century, the road was heavily trafficked, including goods wagons pulled by six, or more horses, and this caused the state of the road to deteriorate. The local parishes appealed to Parliament in 1713 for the right to set up a Turnpike Trust, to pay for the maintenance. Gates were installed at Kingsland and Stamford Hill to collect the tolls.[1]

Development of the area began around 1800, and many prosperous dwellings were built around Stamford Hill over the next 100 years. The London Road became a busy commercial centre to serve the needs of the burgeoning population. Around 1880, not only were railways serving the area, but this was the point where the tram systems coming north from the city,[2] met the Hackney tram system,[3] and so it became a busy interchange, with a depot opening in 1873.[4] Electrification commenced in 1902 and by 1924 a service was commenced between Stamford Hill and Camden Town along Amhurst Park.

Stamford Hill had many eminent Jewish residents, including the Montefiore family. Italian-born Moses Vita Montefiore (died 1789) was living there in 1763. His son Joseph (died 1804) married Rachel Mocatta, and his grandson Abraham Montefiore (died 1824) married Henrietta whose father, the financier Nathan Meyer Rothschild, lived near the modern Colberg Place from 1818 to 1835. The Montefiores' property a little further south was to be transformed by Abraham's grandson, Claude Montefiore, into Montefiore House school. With the increased development of the area, many distinguished families moved away: in 1842 there were few of the wealthy Jews who had once settled in Hackney.[5] The philanthropist and abolitionist MP Samuel Morley had a residence here from about 1860. The gardening writer and cottage gardenerMargery Fish was born Margery Townshend in Stamford Hill in 1892.[6]

From the 1880s, a new influx of Jews arrived in the area escaping from the poverty of the East End in Stepney,[7] and in 1915, the New Synagogue was transferred to Stamford Hill to serve this growing population. In 1926, the Union of Orthodox Hebrew Congregations was established in Stamford Hill, and this became a magnet for other strictly observant Jews, many fleeing Nazi persecution in the years before World War II.[5] Also, many Jewish families came to the area from other areas of London, refugees in their own way from bombing and post-war clearances for new housing. The area became known for its Jewish cultural infrastructure that included many synagogues and Schools as well as unique shopping parades. In the 60’ and 70’s, the area became popular with the Muslim community who have established themselves in the area and developed their own infrastructure that included Mosques and Schools. A distinct feature of the area was the significant adaptation to residential dwellings to accommodate the communities with growing families.

Education in Stamford Hill

The Jesuit order founded St Ignatius' College on 10 September 1894, in two houses called Morecombe Lodge and Burleigh House near Tottenham High Road. In 1907 the College was recognised by the Board of Education and began to receive public money. Notable students of the St Ignatius include Alfred Hitchcock and Cardinal Heenan. It remained at Stamford Hill as a grammar school until 1968, and then became a two-tier, seven-form entry comprehensive school, the Lower School being located at the old Cardinal Allen School in Enfield, and the Upper School in Stamford Hill. In 1987, even the Upper School moved away from Stamford Hill, when both parts were united in Enfield in the course of a major building programme. There are many now some 15 schools in the area, all maintained by The learning Trust, on behalf of Hackney Council. There are also over 20  independent Jewish and Muslim schools in the area.

Some schools that were maintained by the LEA have since given way to residential development. This has led to an acute shortage of schools places in this area to the extent that the department of Education have written to Hackney Council expressing concern. Another interesting feature is that many planning applications for schools that were refused by the Local authority have had their decisions overturned by the planning Inspectorate.

 

Demographics

Stamford Hill reflects the very diverse composition of The London Borough of Hackney. The data table shows ONS Census data[17] for the wards around Stamford Hill, where respondents indicated a religion:[18]

Ward

All

Christian

Buddhist

Hindu

Jewish

Muslim

Sikh

other

None

not stated

Stoke Newington

10,133

4,163

108

147

238

1,563

96

58

2,689

1,071

New River

11,504

3,918

78

96

2,346

1,525

96

80

1,515

1,850

Springfield

10,859

3,512

66

61

2,552

1,352

134

67

1,185

1,930

Lordship

11,299

3,766

81

46

1,949

966

97

96

2,147

2,151

Cazenove

10,500

3,359

74

97

1,390

2,069

127

68

1,784

1,532

Total

54,295

18,718

407

447

8,475

7,475

550

369

9,320

8,534

 

The London Borough of Hackney has expressed its concern that Jewish residents were seriously under-counted in the 2001 Census data[19]

Transport and locale

Stamford Hill is serviced by two Rail Stations (Stamford Hill & Stoke Newington) and by one Tube Station (Manor house) in the area. It also has two more Rail Stations, bordering the area (Clapton & South Tottenham). It also has more then ten Bus routes passing the Area

Religious/Cultural activity in Stamford Hill

Christian community

The Stamford Hill area has an impressive variety of Churches and indeed a high proportion of church run schools. The Christian Community continues to be a very mush vibrant community in the area. Although some Churches have given way to residential development the vast majority of Churches continue to function and the Church run schools continue to flourish.

More recently, with the growing influx of the Polish Community there has been a noticeable increase of activity by this community who have now become the dominant participants and many of the Church in the neighbourhood

Orthodox Jewish community

Stamford Hill is at the centre of an Ashkenazi Orthodox Jewish and predominantly Hasidic community estimated by the local council and others to be some 20,000 strong.[8][9][10] They comprise around 18% of the overall population in Hackney and are growing at a rate of 5% each year.[11] It is the largest Hasidic community in Europe, and referred to as a square mile of piety,[5] reflecting the many Jewish men seen walking in their distinctive clothes on their way to and from worship.

The congregations often represent historical links with particular areas of Eastern Europe in their dress and their worship. In the Stamford hill Area, many families on average have 5.9 children, almost 2.5 times the average for England and Wales, and many families live in overcrowded flats.[10] National planning regulations are applied by the local council, prohibiting "excess" development of family housing. This has led to conflict between the council and the Jewish population, represented by the Union of Orthodox Hebrew Congregations. Agudas Israel Housing Association is active in developing housing for the Jewish community in Stamford Hill.[13] In the surrounding area there may be over 50 synagogues and over 20 Independent Schools.

Orthodox Muslim community

There is also a notable population of Orthodox Muslims and this community is growing in numbers and in influence. This is evident by the growing number of Mosques and Independent Schools in the area and indeed the significant expansion of  the existing ones. The North London Muslim housing association has become one of the larger and more impressive institutions in the area. A significantly high number of Muslim families represent larger families as they are very much a family oriented community.

Unlike the rest of the world, the community relations between the Muslim and Jewish communities is uniquely positive. The both share a joint working committee to represent their interests. 



 


Home | About Us | News&Chat | Forum Library | Profile | Image Gallery | Welcome | Constitution | Join/Register | Contact Us